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X100F, ND filter....and haze!

Discussion in 'X100F, X100T, X100S, X100, and X70' started by buck777, Oct 10, 2017.

  1. buck777

    buck777 Premium Member

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    I’m mostly loving the F ( this is my first X100). I have the X-T2 but Im pushing the boundaries with the F to improve my photography.

    I have noticed ( mostly an hour or two before dusk ) that if I have the ND filter setting on I get a ‘haze’ in the image. It was so pronounced that I actually wondered if I had some condensation on the glass ( I didn’t ). Has anyone else had this?
    A little frustrated.
     
  2. Richard_R

    Richard_R Eclectic eccentric

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    Examples?
    Same shot with and without the ND would be good. With Exif data attached.
     
  3. buck777

    buck777 Premium Member

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    This was one. I deleted a few in annoyance. I’ll get the data and post

    7952347F-9A12-430D-9E5F-C33B7F353E38.jpeg
     
  4. buck777

    buck777 Premium Member

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    I had the TCL on.

    [​IMG]
     
  5. pfogle

    pfogle Puzzled

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    This has been discussed right back to the original X100. This is the lens alone, no ND or converter - it's rather prone to flare anyway.

    Here's my example - I shot this yesterday to check this specific issue (this is at f2.8):

    DSCF3525.jpg
     
  6. buck777

    buck777 Premium Member

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    Sorry, I scrolled through a few topics but didn’t see it.
    In a nutshell, what’s the general consensus? Time of day? Just a quirk with the X100?
     
  7. trainer

    trainer Premium Member

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    My x100s flairs a lot. It's especially bad with light sources just outside of the frame. Many others have found this as well and it doesn't seem to matter what hood is used. Many people like the "character" or "feature" that this gives. I am not one of them. :) I'm not sure it would have made any difference to your shot whether you had the ND filter on or off. I really like my x100s so don't read this as a put down to the x100 series. If I could have just one camera and lens it would be the x100 series.
     
  8. buck777

    buck777 Premium Member

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    Interesting. I’ve been sitting here reading different articles on it. It ‘appears’ to be an issue with the 23 f2, even when it’s the XF attached to an xpro2.
     
  9. lawsofphysics

    lawsofphysics Premium Member

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    The X100 lenses render differently at wider and narrower apertures starting at ~ F4.

    At apertures wider than ~ F4, the X100 lenses are not as sharp when one is close to the subject compared to apertures narrow than F4.

    These characteristics are due to the optical design. They are inherent to the lens. The best X00 lens ever made is not different than the worst lens that met FUJIFILM's quality assurance specifications.

    I don't think the ND filter plays a significant role.

    The bad news is - in some circumstance the lens performance suffers.

    The good news is - you essentially have two different rendering aesthetics at your disposal.

    My Zeiss Sonar ZM 50/1.5, M mount lens had similar properties. It cost as much as an X100F.
     
  10. Jonimages

    Jonimages Premium Member

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    There's a common denominator with both of these shots as samples and they both have strong light sources in the background. Very few lenses will not get a glare or haze when shot in those conditions.
     
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  11. buck777

    buck777 Premium Member

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    I’m a relative novice with the X100, but I’ve had the T1/T2 for a few years now. The big difference with my handling between the F and the T2 is that I tend to use the F in auto mode and manipulate the exposure compensation dial to get what I want, whereas the T2 I’m more manual. I can’t recall every getting thus type of haze with the T2.
    What is perplexing is that I took a shot yesterday in similar light ( maybe not as harsh ) and didn’t have any sign of haze. The significant differences were I was shooting at f2 ( not f2.8), Acros ( not chrome ), had the WCL on ( not the TCL ), lower iso and speed - so basically the answer could be hiding in one of those factors but you’d spend a month trying to figure out which factor was encouraging the haze ( if any ).

    C9A7E6B6-4343-4BF3-BDAD-56991487BFFB.jpeg

    84C74EEA-DE3D-4DA5-9A13-4B7D79C3A0F3.jpeg
     
  12. Jonimages

    Jonimages Premium Member

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    I'm going with backlit as the major cause. Your example is not really similar light. It's sidelit, not backlit. Just look at the shadows. You have detail in the sky, it isn't blown out so that tells me the major lightsource isn't coming from behind. I get a hazy look with my X-T2 and whatever lens I use in backlit scenes. It's called glare and it is a technique some use on purpose, some try to avoid by not shooting backlit or using a hood or placing their hand,ball cap etc over the camera to block the light more.

    I take bracketed real estate shots towards windows with my xt1/X-T2 and 10-24. The over exposed shots with natural light have a haze because the window is the major source of light. I underexposed and use flash as main source of light and haze goes away.

    Yes some lenses will be more prone than others. A dirty front element or even back element can cause this. Some photographers will smear vapor rub on a UV filter or breath on the element to get a haze.
     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2017
  13. vgrooby

    vgrooby Active Member

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    I know what your saying @buck777. I've always suspected the ND Filter adds more haze than what the lens does in some situations. An example of when I usually come across this extra haze is when shooting at f2, ND filter ON and on-board flash ON. Go out during the day and take a few photos with those settings and then the same photos with the ND filter OFF. It's like some of the flash light enters the lens which is hard to imagine as the light source from flash is behind the lens.
     
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  14. DougVaughn

    DougVaughn New Member

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    I know exactly what you're talking about. I was shooting a waterfall a few weeks ago, with the camera on a tripod. I turned the ND filter on to get a longer exposure (same aperture) and got haze. I literally have clear shots (no ND) and hazy shots a few seconds later, without moving the camera or a change in light conditions. It almost looked like mist from the waterfall. I tried to duplicate the "problem" last week just shooting around the city and couldn't make it happen. Can't explain it, and couldn't find anything online that did. Feeling your pain.
     
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  15. buck777

    buck777 Premium Member

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    I did have the on board flash on ( though it didn’t fire ). I going to turn it off and retest. Hope it makes a difference. Thanks for the tip.
     
  16. buck777

    buck777 Premium Member

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    For some reason I feel good reading your post. Started to think I was imagining it
     
  17. dem

    dem Premium Member

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    Did aperture change or shuter speed? The wider aperture would explain the haze with the ND filter on.

    Could you post the two shots please?
     
  18. Carolyn1250

    Carolyn1250 New Member

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    Backlighting usually makes for poor photos (unless you are going for that effect).
     

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