This site is supported by the advertisements on it, please disable your AdBlocker so we can continue to provide you with the quality content you expect.

X-T2 HDR Shots

Discussion in 'X-T2, X-T1, X-T20, X-T10' started by Pobert58, Apr 20, 2017.

  1. Pobert58

    Pobert58 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2013
    Messages:
    155
    Likes Received:
    110
    Location:
    Texas USA

    -Return to Top-

    Last Saturday was Ranch Day at the Ranching Heritage Center in Lubbock, Texas. These are actual ranch buildings from 1870 -1910 that were moved to the site so that they could be preserved. I wanted to get the light in the buildings and the content outside the windows, so it was a 3-shot HDR scenario - all handheld since tripods are not allowed. I have my grandmother's 1915 Hoosier, and it is obvious that one hundred years ago people had to spend a lot more time on daily tasks such as cooking. The flour bin holds around 6 gallons of flour, and my grandmother would have had to bake things on a wood-fired stove.

    The first shot is with the XF 16-55 f/2.8. The Hoosier cabinet on the right was a standard in Prairie life at the turn of the 19th century. The white protrusion on the left side dispenses flour that was added in bulk via the cabinet door above it.
    Hoosier in house Ranch Days 2017-2.jpg

    The second shot, the potbelly stove, is with the 23mm f/2. Wood is scarce in West Texas, so sometimes cattle dung was used as a fuel source.
    Stove in House.jpg
     
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2017
  2. runswithsizzers

    runswithsizzers Premium Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2017
    Messages:
    322
    Likes Received:
    292
    Location:
    on the edge

    -Return to Top-

    I think HDR is great, and interior shots in historical museums often benefit from from this technique.

    You are getting good, natural looking results. Would you care to give a brief outline of your workflow?

    I usually take 3 shots: normal exposure, plus 2 stops, and minus 2 stops - then merge them with PhotoMatrixPro. Examples here. Early results from PhotoMatrix tended to have that over-done, wildly artificial look, but more recently they have added some presets which make it easier to obtain more natural looking results.
     
  3. applebee

    applebee Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2015
    Messages:
    40
    Likes Received:
    49
    Location:
    UK

    -Return to Top-

    Nice and naturally done. Great story too.
     
  4. ErikPloeg

    ErikPloeg Premium Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2015
    Messages:
    286
    Likes Received:
    356
    Location:
    Midden Drenthe - The Netherlands

    -Return to Top-

    +1; well done !
     
  5. Pobert58

    Pobert58 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2013
    Messages:
    155
    Likes Received:
    110
    Location:
    Texas USA

    -Return to Top-

    Runswithsizzers (Gary), the workflow is pretty simple. The degree of separation between exposures depends on the extremes between light and dark in the subject. I used -2 to try and get the correct lighting outside the window on a sunny day, but probably should have used -2.5. If the degree of separation between light and dark is less extreme, then I will use smaller steps like +/- 1 or +/- 2/3. Usually I only have time for one series, so sometimes I shoot 5 exposures but prefer to process only the three or so that seem to be the most appropriate. (Sometimes it takes 4 or 5 exposures.) I try to minimize the number of exposures that go in to the HDR software.

    As to software, I use Aurora HDR with the most conservative (non-HDR-ish) settings. You have some really nice shots on your website! I appreciate the explanation for each image that you provide in the footer that appears on mouse rollover.

    To you and the others who commented, thanks for the kind words.
     
  6. Lumens

    Lumens Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 25, 2015
    Messages:
    170
    Likes Received:
    62
    Location:
    Mesa, AZ

    -Return to Top-

    These photos are excellent. Good use of HDR creating a natural look more like what the eye would see.

    When I do HDR I use my histogram. HDR is needed when the dynamic range is wider than the histogram. I take one shot exposed for the lighted area and then a second exposed for the dark area. This produces two photos, one with the dark area black but light area looking good and the other with the dark area looking good and the light area totally blown out. Merging the two generally gives me one good natural looking photo. I find when I merge too many photos at once I get that "HDR Look" that appears almost like an imitation photo.
     
  7. runswithsizzers

    runswithsizzers Premium Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2017
    Messages:
    322
    Likes Received:
    292
    Location:
    on the edge

    -Return to Top-

    The Aurora HDR software looks good. Not sure I'd be willing to spend ANOTHER $100, having already invested in PhotoMatrixPro. When it first came out PhotoMatrixPro was overpriced for what it could do, but in the past few years it's really matured with new capabilities and a better UI. And I will say this: I was never charged for the updates.

    I have used the bracketed DNG files from my Pentax cameras directly into PhotoMatrixPro, and that works OK. But I haven't yet tried merging any Fuji RAF files. Does that work in Aurora HDR?
     
  8. Pobert58

    Pobert58 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2013
    Messages:
    155
    Likes Received:
    110
    Location:
    Texas USA

    -Return to Top-

    I have had no problem with Fuji RAF files in Aurora HDR. If you are interested in the application it does go on sale from time to time. Yes, I totally get it; mastering one application is usually better than hopping between different applications and mastering none of them. I'm not much of a software person and am doing the latter right now; On1 Photo Raw, Luminar, Affinity Photo and Lightroom. Eventually I will have to adopt (and master) just one or two.
     
  9. Pobert58

    Pobert58 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2013
    Messages:
    155
    Likes Received:
    110
    Location:
    Texas USA

    -Return to Top-

    I totally agree. Only recently have I learned the hard way to spot meter on the brightest part of the scene, take a shot, and then spot meter on the darkest part of the scene for a second shot. Then I will spot meter on a mid-range value for a third shot. Or I will shoot in manual as you suggest, and adjust accordingly. This is of course if I have the luxury of a tripod, which is the less common case. Lacking a tripod, I spot meter on a mid-range part of the scene and tell the camera to under or overexpose by such and such an amount in the bracket sequence.

    I totally agree that the fewer the shots needed for the HDR software, the more realistic the resulting photograph. Thank you!
     
  10. Pobert58

    Pobert58 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2013
    Messages:
    155
    Likes Received:
    110
    Location:
    Texas USA

    -Return to Top-

    Um, I forgot to mention: I am visually impaired and can't actually see the histogram in the viewfinder, but, thanks to the green square on the viewfinder, I can see in general where the metering is going to occur. Definitely a histogram is better - go for it if you can!
     
  11. Melson

    Melson Member

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2017
    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    6

    -Return to Top-

    runswithsizzers, do you mean PhotoMatix, not PhotoMatrix? PhotoMatix has been around a long time, come a long way. FYI: it is currently in beta for a new version.
     
  12. Melson

    Melson Member

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2017
    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    6

    -Return to Top-

    Pobert58, IMO your first HDR image is a bit oversaturated and typical HDR processing in the window highlights.
    Your second image, IMO, is excellent(!), a fine example of HDR properly applied. Well done.
     
  13. runswithsizzers

    runswithsizzers Premium Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2017
    Messages:
    322
    Likes Received:
    292
    Location:
    on the edge

    -Return to Top-

    Melson, yes, I ment PhotoMatixPro from HDRsoft.com. I don't know where I got that extra 'r' from.

    Their website mentions beta version 6 for Windows, but not Mac. I wonder if they are going to want to charge me for the update to version 6, whenever the full Mac version is available? If so, might be a good time to switch to Aurora (?)
     
  14. Melson

    Melson Member

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2017
    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    6

    -Return to Top-

    I'm just a beta tester (since version 1.0) so can't speak for them. The dev team is putting a lot of effort into it, going-on several months now, so I wouldn't be surprised if there's an upgrade fee.
     
  15. runswithsizzers

    runswithsizzers Premium Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2017
    Messages:
    322
    Likes Received:
    292
    Location:
    on the edge

    -Return to Top-

    Actually, after some searching, I found the answer - maybe in the FAQ under upgrade policy:
    "Photomatix Pro 5 license purchased from the HDRsoft.com website allows you to upgrade for free to Photomatix Pro 6, when version 6 is released."

    Sweet!
     
  16. Melson

    Melson Member

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2017
    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    6

    -Return to Top-

    Sweet indeed. This upgrade policy fits their style; the managing staff at HDRsoft are some of the best guys I've worked with.
     
  17. mikEm13

    mikEm13 Premium Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2016
    Messages:
    310
    Likes Received:
    85

    -Return to Top-

    A lot of people, imo over cook HDR but these you did are really great.
     

Share This Page