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Unclear Photo issues: X-T1

Discussion in 'Troubleshooting' started by Marley Buffett, Nov 13, 2017 at 11:28 AM.

  1. colombiano

    colombiano Member

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    Your settings were wrong and that's why images are not good.
    Your primary problem is that you are shooting at way too high ISO. With X-T1 and jpegs out of camera (no raw processing) I don't go above ISO3200 because the noise reduction is too strong and it reduces details. Also, set NR to -2 and you will get a bit more noise but also more details, image will appear sharper. ISO 25000 is a disaster in X-T1, you should never use it.
    As others said, you should learn more about exposure triangle (and I don't want to be patronising, just helpful). Until you master it, you will have problems because you will select inappropriate settings with camera and you will have problems because of that with image quality. Not even one of your shot needs speed more than 1/250 s (even with your people's shot, that's more than enough to prevent their motion blur, because they are almost stationary).
     
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  2. Marley Buffett

    Marley Buffett New Member

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    I'm starting to understand that I was prioritizing my functions incorrectly. I was choosing shutter speed, ISO then Aperture. I think I understand that I should choose ISO, Aperture (dept of field) then Shutter speed. Is this more correct?
     
  3. Marley Buffett

    Marley Buffett New Member

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    I didn't understand the F ring until I read about the exposure triangle so I was using the zoom to create depth of field. Now I understand that I don't need to do that. My firmware is body version 5.10 and lens is 3.21.
     
  4. Greybeard Photography

    Greybeard Photography Premium Member

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    Its not so much prioritizing as thinking about the implications of each setting. It will likely be a balancing act.
     
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  5. GregWard

    GregWard Premium Member

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    I'm not sure there's so much an issue with the priorities so much as not having a full understanding of the best range for each aspect of the exposure triangle. Shutter speed can often be the one that you need to control the most - as too slow an exposure will mean either camera shake and/or movement blur. Although there are occasions when the latter is a good thing (eg water flowing over a waterfall) mostly these two things are to be avoided. So you need an exposure that is "fast enough" to avoid these. The difficult aspect is working out how fast that needs to be when, clearly, this is very scene dependent. A racing car needs a faster exposure than a sleeping cat!

    Next you probably want to think about the aperture. Ideally you probably want to be using f5.6 or f8 to get the best out of the lens. But this assumes a couple of things. Firstly that the depth of field (the amount of your image that will be acceptably in focus) is then appropriate for the image you want to take. A higher f stop will (all other things being equal) give more in focus. This can be a good thing (person in front of a famous sight) or a bad thing (same person but now you want the background blurred to focus the attention on the person). So sometimes you need to set the aperture as the priority. Bearing in mind that having the aperture too high gets you beyond the sharpest the lens can manage (something known as diffraction).

    The second consideration is the acceptable range of the ISO on the camera. Most manufacturers give their cameras access to ISO levels that are really best avoided. Opinions as to where - exactly - the acceptable range stops will vary. But I think most of us would happily shoot Fuji X up to 1600 and probably 3200 on occasion. So if you can achieve the shutter speed and aperture you'd like and the ISO is (say) 800 - then you should be good to go. If not then you need to re-consider because the key word is then compromise.

    More often than not that word (compromise) will be what you need to understand. But, to do so, you need to read up more on the exposure triangle I think.
     
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  6. Irene McC

    Irene McC Premium Member

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    Photography is about capturing light.

    The way the light is captured depends entirely on your selected camera settings.
    These are determined by the Exposure Triangle.

    Shutter Speed - how long you are allowing light to enter your lens
    Aperture - the size of the 'hole' through which the light is flowing into your lens
    ISO - the sensitivity of your sensor and the way it responds to the light

    Each part of the three pillars plays a different role.

    It is vital to have an understanding of all these functions before making a
    decision on how to set your camera for a specific shot in specific conditions.
     
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  7. Demoz

    Demoz Premium Member

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    Only very experienced photographers would get a reasonable exposure by choosing all settings manually. And usually when you want to take a shot, you do not have the time to adjust all of your settings first.

    Let the camera do the work for you and shoot in aperture priority. You choose the aperture on the lens and the camera calculates shutterspeed and ISO depending on the parameters you have set in the ISO menu (f.e. min shutterspeed 1/200 and max ISO 12800). You leave the shutterspeed dial on A (Auto).

    With these settings, you will be fine for normal lighting conditions and your image quality will improve. I`d guess the majority of us here shoots in aperture priority on most occasions.

    Try that and see how it works for you. Happy shooting.
     
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  8. GregWard

    GregWard Premium Member

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    Yes I would agree with @Demoz. Also not a bad idea to set aperture priority with a wide open aperture (fastest that lens will allow) for a quick "grab shot". Simply set Auto ISO (but with a sensible upper limit (say 3200?). Having made sure there's "an image in the can" then slow down and consider the exposure triangle to take a set of images with "better" (more appropriate) settings. If you still have time then - especially in tricky lighting - there's nothing wrong with trying different settings (especially whilst gaining experience). Getting some shots really really wrong (as long as you got a right one as well!) can be a very good learning experience.
     
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  9. Marley Buffett

    Marley Buffett New Member

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    OK, I like this idea. Another one I hadn't thought of. I can learn from my camera as it chooses the shutter speed when I choose ISO. Thanks for your thoughts.
     
  10. fujixacros

    fujixacros Premium Member

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    You choose the aperture.....

    Don't forget, that the Fujinon XF 18-55mm ƒ/2.8-4 R LM OIS is with variable aperture of F2.8-4 .

    When you increase the focal length, the maximum aperture size decreases :
    18mm F2.8
    35mm F3.6
    55mm F4

    Hope it helps.
     
  11. DougMac

    DougMac Premium Member

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    This made me chuckle. I spent almost all my photographic life, including the time I was a full time professional, shooting with cameras that were completely manual, including focus. I didn't own a camera with a zoom lens until 2002.

    I don't miss those days in the slightest. I don't miss the hours spent in the wet lab darkroom. I embrace new technology wholeheartedly. Having said that, though, I do think it is helpful for all photographers to have an understanding of the underlying principles. I spend a few classes covering this when I teach photography.

    My personal shooting style starts with an assessment of the situation. What is more important, controlling the depth of field or controlling the shutter speed? For most of my photography, I want to adjust the aperture to control depth of field, therefore I usually shoot aperture priority. I just shot my grandson running a cross country race. In this instance, shutter priority was more important, although I did want to have adequate depth of field. This is an instance where shutter priority makes sense.

    The last adjustment is ISO. I always start at the lowest possible ISO. I raise the ISO only to be able to shoot at the aperture I think is correct, correlated with an appropriate shutter speed. Landscape and general travel photography, along with portraiture is fairly static so I make sure my shutter speed is fast enough to allow me to shoot hand held. I use the 1/equivalent 35mm focal length, x2 if possible. For instance, if I'm shooting with the 18-55 @ 55mm, that's roughly 80mm in 35mm equivalency, so I'd like to shoot with a shutter speed of at least 160th/sec. Of course, good OIS like the Fuji lenses have allow me to shoot slower. Using the same example, with OIS I would feel comfortable shooting at 1/80 or even 1/40 in a pinch. If I was really brave, I might even go as low as 1/30, but even with OIS that's pretty low. My years of shooting hand held with slow film led me to develop good habits to shoot at pretty slow shutter speeds, but don't try this at home, especially if you're an old fart like me.
     
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  12. Demoz

    Demoz Premium Member

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    I think its important to get Marley going. You don´t learn it all in 1 day. I think he needs to go out and shoot on aperture priority to get the exposure right. He will learn about the creative potential of aperture and can concentrate on composition. When he meets more challenging situations in low light or sports photography will be another day.

    I usually stick to 1/200 with my 35mm WR and manual lenses from 28mm to 85mm as well. I shoot mainly people and 1/200 is safe eough for movement blur. Also for camera shake on a hungover day.

    I own a GW690, which is great fun to shoot. And with plenty of sun here it is easy to expose, using the "sunny 16 rule". Shooting film has cured my habit of taking 5 shots of the same object too.
     
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  13. DougMac

    DougMac Premium Member

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    This is a good group. I agree with whoever pointed out that we didn't condescend and suggest he needed something simpler. Each of us find ourselves in a different point on the path. I celebrate our common love for a creative endeavor.
     
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  14. MassillonFun

    MassillonFun Well-Known Member

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    +1 to everything this man said.
    Thank you for typing it all out so that I didn't have to.
     

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