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trying to break a bad habit

Discussion in 'General Photography Discussion' started by rybolt, Jun 12, 2018.

  1. rybolt

    rybolt rybolt Staff Member

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    I'm wondering if any other former-film shooters have this problem:
    When I shot film a lot of what I did was for stock. My main market was airline magazines and they were sold world--wide. When I got an image that I knew was going to be something I could use I would crank off 6-10 shots if it wasn't moving. The theory was that the best dupe was one that you did in-camera.
    Now that I'm shooting digital-raw+jpeg- I'm finding that I still do this. Not so many as before but almost always 2-3 shots. Memory cards are large and cheap and storage is bountiful but it sure clogs up your browser when you start editing.
    I'm resolving myself to trying to eliminate this habit the next time I shoot something that doesn't require burst shooting.
     
  2. lawsofphysics

    lawsofphysics Premium Member

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    I rarely did multiple shots when I used film cameras. But I never did a gig with a film camera either.

    I usually do bursts using raw files. I typically do 0, +1/3, -1/3 aperture bracketing in manual exposure mode using base ISO. My goal is to maximize exposure when the shutter is open. During post-production I keep the exposure that retains important highlight region detail and delete the other two.

    With the the X-Pro 2 I use base ISO in bright light and ISO 800 in low light because the XTrans-III cameras have two ISO invariant regions. One region provides the highest dynamic range and less sensitivity while the other has more sensitivity.and less dynamic range.

    Often the default post-production rendering will appear too dark because the appropriate shutter time and aperture results in unavoidable underexposure. This is remidied by increasing the raw software exposure slider. In other words, I don't use ISO to achieve an acceptable image brightness after the shutter closes, I use the raw rendering software.

    The advantage to this is in low light situations you only have to think about the shutter time and aperture required for the subject(s) at hand. ISO will never be unnecessarily high. In bright light I usually have to think about maximizing exposure without over exposing the sensor at base ISO. Sometimes I use shutter priority exposure mode so they initial exposure is close to overexposure. In very bright conditions I will switch to 1/2 or 1 stop aperture brackets.

    In extreme low light I set my ISO to 3200, use manual exposure and use required the shutter time and aperture. Color images seem to be slightly cleaner – especially with the X100T.

    This method is not practical for in-camera JPEGs. When sensor exposure is not optimized, JPEG compression eliminates data important to achieve optimum image aesthetics during post-production rendering. This is not relevant for a perfectly exposed and brightened in-camera JPEGs. The data destroyed during compression is redundant because the all the raw data was used in-camera to brighten the rendering after the shutter closes.

    Bursts are also useful for facial expressions. For event photography I used them to minimize issues like subjects having their eyes closed, etc.
     
    pointreyes, rybolt and surfdogs like this.
  3. rybolt

    rybolt rybolt Staff Member

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    Yes. I manage a music camp and do the stills of the live performances. You have to over-shoot to be sure that you get the image that you're hoping for.

    I appreciate the technical reasons that you bracket exposures even in raw. The older that I get the less that I am concerned with the 'perfect' or even 'optimal' exposure. Variations in monitors, printers and everything else makes perfection either unobtainable for me or even practical to try to obtain. I want a file that I can make into something that pleases me and my standards are mid-level. Your experience is obviously different and your system works for you.
     
  4. kenbennett

    kenbennett Premium Member

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    I still do this all the time, too. Yes, it does sometimes drive me nuts :) but you are not alone.
     

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