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Discussion in 'General' started by CWRailman, Dec 6, 2018.

  1. CWRailman

    CWRailman Premium Member

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    It's early evening as Cumbres and Toltec locomotive #489 and it’s passenger consist rolls past the water tank and coaling tipple as it returns to the Chama, New Mexico station after the days run up to Antonito Colorado and back. While the excursion is complete for the passengers, the day is not over for the crew who must now turn the locomotive on the wye and get it prepared for the next days' run. The sun will have set before their work is complete.
    Chama 462-Edit-Reduced.jpg
    Fuji X-T2, ISO 400, 1/200ss, aperture priority, +0.3 Exposure Compensation, 18-55mm lens, f 10.0 at a focal length of 18mm
     
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  2. Fujiphotog

    Fujiphotog Amateur photographer.

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    What is the approximate top speed for this locomotive with these cars.
     
  3. CWRailman

    CWRailman Premium Member

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    These locomotives have 44 inch diameter drivers and a standard rule of thumb for steam locomotives was that the top speed was the same as the driver diameter but due to safety concerns etc their speed is limited to around 25-28MPH on the flats and obviously less on the curves or grades.

    Locomotive 999, which at the time of construction was built with 86 inch diameter drivers, was reported by news papers as having hit the 100mph threshold. However, there is no official documentation to support that claim despite the fact that it was fitted with a 100mph speed gauge. In reality it probably never exceeded 86mph as Please login or register to view linkswhich is supported by early interviews with officials who were on that train and published in numerous books and periodicals of the time. Even back then reporters liked to sensationalize such events.
     
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  4. Richard_R

    Richard_R Eclectic eccentric Staff Member

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    The snow plow on the front reminded me of this footage from NZ a couple of years ago.
    There isn't much demand for snow clearing on Australian train lines. :D

     
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  5. CWRailman

    CWRailman Premium Member

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    Yes the plows on the front of the steam locomotives were also used for the occasional snow drifts. However, when the snow got heavier and the drifts higher, in some cases higher than the locomotive, this is how they dealt with it. A steam powered rotary plow, which is not self propelled, that is pushed by a steam powered locomotive. In this video you can occasionally hear the steam engine slip when the rotary gets blogged down. By the way if and when one of the blades from the rotary broke off it was similar to a hand grenade explosion so the blade assemblies were frequently inspected during these snow removal exercises. Go to about the 1:40 mark to see this rotary in action.
     
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