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New Fuji Owner!

Discussion in 'Member Introductions' started by Wicked Jester, Feb 13, 2018.

  1. Wicked Jester

    Wicked Jester New Member

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    Hey everyone, just purchased a refurbished x-t10! I came from a Canon SL1.

    Interested and trying out some vintage manual lenses!
     
    Andrew Moran and kenbennett like this.
  2. kenbennett

    kenbennett Premium Member

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    Welcome, hope you enjoy it. Old lenses are fun :)
     
  3. trainer

    trainer Premium Member

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    Welcome to the forum Jester. There's lots of info on old lens here.
     
  4. Blazer

    Blazer Fuji Commander

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    Well hello wicked one, and welcome to the X-family! I've often thought of trying some old glass but have not yet given that a try. My old eyes are pretty dependent on autofocus now days. ;)
     
  5. Marty M

    Marty M Premium Member

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    Try a fast 50 on it and you'll fall in love!
     
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  6. bacil

    bacil Premium Member

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    Welcome.
     
  7. Wintersong

    Wintersong Premium Member

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    I use quite a number of vintage manual lenses in my work, and have some lens recommendations and tips:

    First off, if you shoot RAW, there's nothing better than setting film simulation to B&W, with focus peaking in red or blue, for nailing the focus. If you're shooting RAW, the film simulation you use has no effect on your files, so it's just influencing the user experience.

    Next up, adapters, even medium to high end ones, aren't perfect. I've got a $99 Metabones MD adapter that can't hit infinity with most of my MD lenses for instance. I tend to buy K&F or Fotodiox adapters. Most of those hit infinity before the len's infinity stop, so you have to be careful not to over-rotate when shooting far away subjects.

    Anything wider than about 28mm in vintage will either be crap or as expensive as buying Fuji or Rokinon (though there are some good 24mm f2.8 or slower too). Likewise, most vintage zooms aren't worth the scrap value of the metal in them, but there are some notable exceptions, such as the Minolta 35mm-70mm f3.5 Macro, which was developed in collaboration with Leica. But the zooms that are worth owning can probably be counted on one or two hands, so focus on primes as a rule.

    Fast primes rock, but "fast" in vintage terms and modern terms mean different things. The list of primes that are going to be razor sharp at f1.4 isn't very long, although if center of frame is all that matters, there are some out there. But to get excellent sharpness by f2 or 2.8 is totally doable, so for the most part you'll be stopping down a bit, but there's nothing wrong with that. My Pentax-M SMC 50mm f1.7 is competitive with the best 5os out there in terms of sharpness by f2 or 2.8.

    Depending on what you shoot, lens coatings may be a huge deal, or not matter at all. And a cheap screw-in collapsible lens hood can go a long way to making up for lack of multi-coatings in all but the toughest shooting environments. I am often shooting by the beach or in a club, so I care more than most.

    You'd be shocked how little impact fine dust or scratches on the front element of a lens matter. But stopped down, those things on the rear or inner elements can make a bigger impression. All lenses have some dust, and that's ok, but for me at least, haze is much less tolerable, and fungus in a lens is a hard "no."

    Here are some of the lenses I've owned or currently use, and my general thoughts:

    My current lens lineup:

    Modern Lenses (current)
    • Fuji 18-55 f2.8-4 - a workhorse
    • Fuji 23mm f1.4 - one of the most beautiful lenses I've ever used, and I'm in love with the clutch focus mechanism
    • Fuji 35mm f2 - zippy and pretty
    • Rokinon 12mm f2 - I've done some fantastic work with this lens
    • Opteka 15mm f4 Macro (mounted in Nikon F with adapter actually) - a giant pain in the ass to use, especially as 1:1 macro is achieved 4mm from the front element but when everything comes together nothing else takes photos like it
    Vintage Lenses (in current use):
    • Vivitar 28mm f2.8 Close Focus (Komine Version) - a fabulous lens, though I wish I owned the f2 version
    • Minolta 35mm-70mm f3.5 Macro - stellar image quality and bokeh, but I don't like the front element rotating, and the lens is known to be a on the delicate side, also "macro" is a generous term for its close focus ability
    • Minolta 50mm f3.5 Macro - a 1:2 Macro with a branded 1:1 extension, it takes sharp photos, but there's something lifeless about them (I've also got the Nikon 55mm f3.5 Macro on loan, but I haven't played with it yet)
    • Pentax-M SMC 50mm f1.7 - killer sharpness (other than f1.7), but meh bokeh, fantastic multi-coating, and my excellent condition one was less than $100 from KEH
    • Olympus OM MC 85mm f2 - one of my favorite lenses I've ever owned, and the reason I don't own the Fuji 90mm f2. It's light, compact, sharp, and lovely, though prone to flare without a hood
    • Kiron 105mm f2.8 Macro (1:1) - also sold as the Lester A Dine dental lens, it's a beast (as in heavy and huge), but the results are worth the hassle
    • Konica 135mm f3.2 - stopped down a bit, this lens takes sharp, glorious photos. It replaced my CZJ 135mm f3.5 when that lens died, and with a lot to live up to, it excelled
    • Canon FD 35mm-105mm f3.5 Macro (72mm version) - has a good reputation, and I bought it very cheap to play around with. I'm still reserving judgement
    Modern Lenses (I don't use anymore)
    • Fuji 18-135mm - I pretty much hated this lens. It was huge, slow, and most of all, I was really underwhelmed by its image quality
    • Fuji 35mm f1.4 - I know this is supposed to be a magical piece of glass, but I couldn't make myself love it. The bokeh was often unappealing, the front element turned, and it was glacial to focus on my X-T1
    • Fuji 55-230 - I really liked the lens for the day I used it, but a failure of a strap connection on my camera caused the camera+lens to fall, where the plastic rear mount shattered, causing major damage to my sensor (it's usable wider than f5, but tighter than that and you can see the damage clearly on the image). I bought the lens used pretty cheap, and don't want to pour good money after bad having it the bayonet replaced, although the lens still works perfectly if I hold it in place on the camera.
    • Rokinon 21mm f1.4 - this is a beautiful lens, and I still take it out to play occasionally, but it's hard to hit the focus at f1.4 and the Fuji 23mm f1.4 took its place
    Vintage Lenses (I don't use anymore)
    • Vivitar 28mm f2.5 - never really used it, it's junk
    • Pentax Takumar 28mm f3.5 - a disappointment compared to the later generations of this lens
    • Konica 40mm f1.8 - I don't know if I've ever wanted to like a lens as much as this one, but I just never did. It takes nice enough photos, though its light transmission is terrible, but to me it was nothing special
    • Minolta Rokkor-X 50mm f1.4 - a fine lens, but I ended up preferring the lighter Pentax 50mm f1.7, which is sharper at f2 and 2.8 than the Minolta at the same f-stops
    • Minolta Rokkor 50mm f1.7 (55mm dia) - also a fine lens, but the Pentax was more compact and could stop down to f2, which the Minolta couldn't
    • Minolta Rokkor 50mm f1.7 (49mm dia) - I was severely underwhelmed, and mine was NOS
    • Yashica ML 50mm f2 - a fine lens, but nothing special
    • Pentax Takumar 55mm f1.8 - maybe mine was a bad copy, but it was a soft piece of junk
    • CZJ 50mm f2.8 - love the close focus and bokeh, but I shoot in enough low light environments that the 2.8 is a bit slow for me
    • Konica 57mm f1.4 - when this lens is on, it's ON, but I find that I all too often miss focus, even at f2.8 and tighter. Nonetheless, I shot a wedding with it and got some fantastic photos. It's not a lens I'd part with yet, but it doesn't come out often
    • Helios 44M 58mm f2 - sharp as a knife, with the "swirly" bokeh folk love. It's a great lens, but flares if you even look at it wrong, and its contrast isn't the best. But the reason I tend not to use it is that its heavy as hell
    • Nikon 105mm f2.5 (non-AI) - a great lens, but mine is a loaner from a friend with a sentimental attachment to it, and it's got more haze than I like dealing with. Because of the sentimental value, and it not being mine, I'm reluctant to have it serviced
    • Minolta 200mm f4 - Not a bad lens, but it's a tripod queen and the with the MD adapter I have with a tripod collar it can't hit infinity, and on the adapter where it can, it's ungainly. Plus, I only ever used it for moonrises, where I find the Konica 135 gives me a better look with more context
    I'm sure there are some I'm missing there, but hopefully it's a helpful list.

    Oh, and here's my (safe-for-work) photography portfolio site, so you have a sense of what I've done with this stuff - Please login or register to view links that first photo on the home page is one of the ones from the Konica 57mm actually
     
  8. Wicked Jester

    Wicked Jester New Member

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    Wow, thank you very much! Very helpful!

    So one thing I'm unsure of is how to class a lens as far as haze and fungus.

    I can typically see if a lens is scratched and can see the dust sometimes. But how do you tell if there is haze/fungus?

    Do you have to attach it to a camera to tell or can you see it easily just looking at the lens?
     
  9. Wintersong

    Wintersong Premium Member

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    That's the sort of thing you can see looking at the lens. For haze, if you hold the lens up to a light source at an angle, and see a "beam" of light going through the lens, that's haze (or sometimes dust). It can also manifest in the rear or front element simply appearing milky when light is shined through the lens. The light shouldn't "catch' on any lens elements, it should pass through cleanly. Fungus is even easier, since you can literally see the fungus growing in the lens. If you search "lens fungus" in google images you'll get tons of examples of different ways fungus can appear. Ditto with "lens haze" actually. It's worth noting that sometimes what appears as "haze" could be caused by fungus, but more often it's caused by oils from the lens mechanism precipitating onto the lens elements, or due to the cement used in the lens construction beginning to discolor.

    Other things I didn't mention, but are worth looking out for include the performance of the aperture (you want the aperture to open and close quickly and evenly), oil on the aperture blades (which isn't the end of the world, but can cause haze or flaring), and that there's no element separation/de-lamination (caused by the cement between lens elements failing and the elements pulling apart from each other).
     
  10. Max Fstop

    Max Fstop Premium Member

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    Welcome to the forum, enjoy ;)
     
  11. Brent Dacus

    Brent Dacus Premium Member

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    Welcome to the only Fuji Forum you will ever need.. Welcome to the Fuji Family.
     
  12. Andrew Moran

    Andrew Moran New Member

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    Welcome to the Fuji family, I'm a new Fuji user as well! And would also love to try some vintage lenses.....I'm also New here. There seems to be alot of great info in this forum, enjoy!
     
  13. trainer

    trainer Premium Member

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    Welcome to the forum.
     
  14. lightsketcher

    lightsketcher Premium Member

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