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Long exposures with electronic shutter?

Discussion in 'General X Camera Forum' started by ojporqpojrewpo, Jun 13, 2018.

  1. ojporqpojrewpo

    ojporqpojrewpo Premium Member

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    Does anybody know if there are drawbacks when you take long exposures (>30s) with electronic shutter? I know there can be artifacts with very short exposures but how about long ones?
     
  2. lawsofphysics

    lawsofphysics Premium Member

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    Yes, artifacts can appear when the ES shutter read-out rate aliases with camera or subject motion and, or light affected by modulation.

    For instance, some LED lights are controlled using pulse-width modulation. The modulation rate aliases with the ES read-out rate. The most common result is color banding.
     
  3. ojporqpojrewpo

    ojporqpojrewpo Premium Member

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    Would that apply to something like star trails or Milky Way shots?
     
  4. specLegacy

    specLegacy Premium Member

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    I haven't used ES that much, but my thought is that most of the drawbacks of ES happen under artificial light or with fast-moving subjects.

    ES might also introduce more noise than MS, but that's probably negligible if you're stacking a lot of images to create star trails.

    Milky Way shots are usually under a minute, so it would be worth trying both the ES and MS to see if there's any difference. One simple advantage for MS is that you can hear when the exposure is done :)
     
  5. ojporqpojrewpo

    ojporqpojrewpo Premium Member

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    That's one of the reasons I am asking. The shutter noise bothers me when I do stacked star trails and also it feels like it adds wear to the shutter mechanism. Probably not a real concern but something that made me think ...
     
  6. dem

    dem Premium Member

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    I don't think there are any drawbacks as far as the image quality is concerned.
    I wonder if there is an explanation for why this might happen, test shots?
     
  7. specLegacy

    specLegacy Premium Member

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    I think I have to take my comment back. I got this misconception from Sony cameras, which drop to 12-bit mode when using electronic shutter, whereas they use 14-bit mode for images taken with the mechanical shutter. It seems that there's no image quality penalty for Fujis. Not that I could find after a quick search, anyway.
     
    lawsofphysics and dem like this.
  8. lawsofphysics

    lawsofphysics Premium Member

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    I doubt it. The earth's motion is very slow compared to the ES read-out speed.
     
  9. lawsofphysics

    lawsofphysics Premium Member

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    I doubt the input-referred read noise level is higher with the ES.

    Here is a blog article Please login or register to view links that documents one person's ES problems with a SONY A7s. It is entirely possible these results are irrelevant to FUJIFILM's ES design.
     
  10. Doug Pardee

    Doug Pardee Premium Member

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    The next time someone asks how fast the sensor readout speed is, I think I'm going to reply, "at least it's faster than the earth's motion"! ;)
     
  11. ojporqpojrewpo

    ojporqpojrewpo Premium Member

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    Tried some long exposures with ES last week and it worked flawlessly.


    Please login or register to view links
     
  12. Warwick

    Warwick Premium Member

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    The downside of slow exposures with the electronic shutter is that anything that’s moving gets distorted and weird-looking. This is because the sensor isn’t exposed all once, unless I’m mistaken. I think it’s exposed in a sweeping motion, like the picture on a tv screen.
     
  13. dem

    dem Premium Member

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    You are right in saying that the sensor is not exposed at once when using the ES - the bottom of the image starts its exposure 1/15 sec after the top. You are mistaken thinking that this will make a big effect over a 2 minute exposure. Moving objects will appear blurred with either mechanical or electronic shutter.

    The distortion of moving subjects is an issue at fast shutter speeds like 1/1000 sec. By the way mechanical shutter also distorts images taken above flash sync shutter speed for the same reason (the sensor is not exposed at once), but the effect is about 20 times less and practically unnoticeable.
     

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