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Image Quality problem

Discussion in 'X-T3, X-T2, X-T1, X-T20, X-T10, X-T100' started by Ron Emmons, Nov 7, 2018.

  1. Jonimages

    Jonimages Premium Member

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    That is true. I think most advanced amateurs and enthusiast have more demanding standards than working pros when it comes to gear and IQ.

    When Fuji released the 80 mm, portrait photographers were saying it may be too sharp for portraits. They were mocked because some people didn't understand how a lens can be too sharp. A pro thinks it's one less step I have to take in the editing process if I don't have to smooth out skin pores.
     
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  2. Fujiphotog

    Fujiphotog Amateur photographer.

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    I shoot RAW + jpeg. In my little basement studio I shoot all manual, with flash. But outdoors I set the shutter speed manually fast enough to avoid motion blur, and set the f stop for the depth of field I want. Then, most of the time I set the ISO to auto, with a limit of 3200 or even 6400. That way if I'm shooting wildlife, or my dog, or even portraits, I don't have to keep changing the ISO manually. This allows me both to control the two most sensitive parts of the exposure triangle (shutter and aperture) and also to shoot with the same fluidity as if I had set the camera to all Auto.
     
  3. Jonimages

    Jonimages Premium Member

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    I tried that method but didn't like how exposure was all over the place. When editing photos in batch I like to make one exposure adjustment and then apply that to the series of photos. What I have done is assigned ISO to the front command dial. I can make ISO changes in a snap without taking my eye off the EVF. More consistent exposure for me anyway. This is part of the reason why I wouldn't mind if Fuji did away with the dials on top of the camera. I know there's nostalgia with the manual dials but I would rather have more function buttons on top since I have the command dials programmed to shutter/ISO.
     
  4. cug

    cug Premium Member

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    I'm not a photographer, but in my own profession it's exactly the same: You get what satisfies the "needs", not what satisfies the "wants".
     
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  5. F2Bthere

    F2Bthere Premium Member

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    I really prefer the dials as Fuji has it.

    I like the glance down at the top of the camera having all the information I need to see. I can also see the information in my finder and adjust dials by feel if I choose. I don't like a top mounted LCD for info as much. This is a big part of why I like the ergonomics of Fuji.
     
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  6. Jonimages

    Jonimages Premium Member

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    I can understand that. In my case sometimes I can't take the time to even glance down if I have something happening quickly. The knobs are just not quick enough when I don't even have to take my eye away from EVF to just shutter speed and ISO. I'm hoping the X-H2 does away with top dials and just goes with dedicated buttons and a command dial like Nikon does.
     
  7. Ron Emmons

    Ron Emmons New Member

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    Ah, this is what I need to know. So how do you disable scene modes?
     
  8. cug

    cug Premium Member

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    You just don't use them. You can set the camera to all automatic, as long as you don't use any of the features that explicitly won't work with raw, it'll produce a raw file. But stuff like some of the "artistic filters" don't work then. You can produce these effects in post-processing though.
     
  9. F2Bthere

    F2Bthere Premium Member

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    So you want the Fuji to be just like a Nikon (or Canon or Sony). :( A lot of what is distinctive and special about Fuji is that it preserves the classic interface.

    You can still see the settings in the viewfinder if you choose to display them. The reason to have them visible from the top is so that you can glance down if the camera is on a tripod or held low or with a strap over your shoulder or neck or in your lap, turned on or not.

    This also allows more discrete camera handling and adjustment (street photography or otherwise being unobtrusive, like talking with a subject and then raising the camera to take a picture as part of the natural flow). Have you seen that rare footage of Henri Cartier-Bresson in action? Or Gary Winogrand? Or watched classic portrait photographers in calm conversation with their subjects and then they casually raise a camera or release a shutter on the tripod?

    There are a lot of old-school ways people have used cameras that work very well for a reason.

    The way it is now, those who prefer classic controls have what they want and you can set the dials to have what you want (minus a few extra buttons on top), no?

    It just seems that when you turn the camera into a souped up computer, you might as well shoot a Nikon or Canon or Sony and just be very choosy about only getting the best lenses. The features you are asking for are so easy to find. What Fuji does is not. Fuji is special because it supports a well-honed way of working which has stood the test of time. And they also give you front and rear dials to configure as you wish.

    I worry about Nikanony creep.
     
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  10. Chuck Carstensen

    Chuck Carstensen Premium Member

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  11. cug

    cug Premium Member

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    To be fair: using a Canon or Nikon is BY FAR faster than using a Fuji. Completely switching the settings in one go, from portrait to sport to whatever is just switching between two or three modes. No setting "set this to auto, this to a higher shutter, this to lower ISO, AF mode switch, different metering ... WTF ... oh, the situation is over ... actually it was five minutes ago". Fujis are horribly slow to switch between completely different scenarios.

    The X-H1 is already on the way to the more DSLR style handling, switching over just that body would help Fuji more than it would hurt. All the other bodies can stay the way they are, but the X-H1 is a bastard between two worlds. Might as well move it to the world Fuji doesn't have today.

    There are also reasons whey DSLRs have developed to what they are today. Fast, efficient working machines. Fun to use? Maybe not. Efficient? Hell yes.
     
  12. YogiMik

    YogiMik Premium Member

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    I tried that, too . . . and it did not work for me. The best for me, is too assign SS to the front dial, and regulate desired exposure with that. My ISO is hard set on 200, rarely touch this, max up to 400 on most of situations. When I shoot high ISO, usualy just for the desired effect. But, normally, I do not wish to go above ISO 400. Max DR range matters for me.
     
  13. F2Bthere

    F2Bthere Premium Member

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    Do you actually have real world need for this capability or know photographers who are often unprepared or surprised into needing this? This isn't something photojournalists I know depend on and I'm trying to figure out who else needs this. I'm rarely shooting flowers in a field and having a hockey game break out :).

    Having ISO, SS, Aperture and Compensation dials as they are doesn't really take away from the ability to efficiently change shooting setting modes. Hit a button, twirl a wheel. How many times per day would you do this. ISO, SS, Aputure, Compensation--very basic.

    If this is a real need, implementing this capability is a relatively simple firmware improvement of menu settable preset states which can be assigned to a control. It isn't rocket science and I'm pretty sure you or I could map out the spec requirements quickly enough ;).
     
  14. cug

    cug Premium Member

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    I don't have a real need for it, it just pisses me off quite a lot with the Fujis. They are so darn slow to get to a known state, it's really annoying. And I've been shooting with Fujis exclusively for the last six years, so I'm used to the slowness. Whenever I pick up my wife's Canon I'm blown away how fast working with other cameras is.
     
  15. Ron Emmons

    Ron Emmons New Member

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    In the shooting menu, for 'Scene position', there are a bunch of choices, and I've always left it on Advanced SR Auto as I don't like to use these things, but (and excuse me if I seem stupid) I don't see any way to de-select or disable the scene position, so can someone explain how I 'just don't use them'?
     
  16. YogiMik

    YogiMik Premium Member

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    It is to have programmable modes, like P1, P2, P3 . . . to quickly switch between them. I miss them, too . .
    when, i.e. shooting street in slow pace, and suddenly I have a situation, that I need a much faster SS, or a much higher ISO, or both,
    that I need to respond within two secs, or it's too late. With Fuji's I've learned to ignore such opportunities, and move on.
    There's no freaking way, I can do this with Fuji. It's really frustrating.
    I tried with auto ISO, and it doesn't cut, cos I get undesirable exposures, and pisses me off.
    I'm laughing at those saying X100 is a real street photography camera, ha ha . . . nothing is further from the truth . .
    but, it looks very sexy on the street.
    In landscape, you shoot a nice scenery, and suddenly you see a flying over flock of birds in the nice setting.
    Before you get Fuji to shoot this, the birds will flew over to Africa, already.
    So, this is a real need for such modes, and I miss them as badly, as I miss a tilty in X-Pro2.
    Don't tell me to get X-T2 instead, cos it has a tilty.
    I can't shoot with this cam at all without poking a finger into my right freaking eye, and smearing glasses.
    Still, no P modes. How Fuji could miss on that?
    Sometimes, I don't understand their mentality. It supposed to be a practical camera for photographers.
    A camera should not get in the way between a photog, and the subject . . .
    But, I'm looking into Z6. It has programmable modes, a very nicely implemented EVF, and a tilty. Just, I need to make sure, it will work well with M mount lenses, and this is a camera for me.
     
  17. YogiMik

    YogiMik Premium Member

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    I don't know. Never shot in scene setting. But, if you set all settings to factory default . . . that will do the trick.
     
  18. versesinanelegiacmetre

    versesinanelegiacmetre Member

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    Take your camera off Auto, using the lever which comes off the SS dial.

    Set the left hand dial to S for single shot, set your aperture either to a value or A, set your SS to a value or the red A.
    Take your picture.

    Never use the Auto lever, always set it to Off
     
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  19. Ron Emmons

    Ron Emmons New Member

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    Thank you. At last I see that if the auto lever is off, the scene positions don't appear in the shooting menu. Problem solved.
     
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  20. F2Bthere

    F2Bthere Premium Member

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    I suggest we start a discussion thread to figure out exactly what would solve this program mode P1, P2, P3 desire.

    I believe this could easily enough be programmed into existing cameras as a firmware upgrade if we could come up with a compelling statement of why it would be useful, how it would work and what features would be controlled.

    If you think this would make Fuji cameras better, please share your thoughts here:

    Please login or register to view links
     
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