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Crop or get a superzoom?

Discussion in 'Fuji X Post Processing' started by jer1, Aug 12, 2017 at 9:20 PM.

  1. jer1

    jer1 New Member

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    I hope I am in the right forum for this question. I have an X-t10 camera, and am thinking about getting an
    older manual everything lens or a superzoom camera such as the Panasonic FZ300 camera for "static"
    bird and small animal pictures for printing ( 8x10 8x12 16x20 ) nothing bigger. The size of lens I am thinking about would be in the 300mm focal length. I do not know anything about cropping, but which would be the best way to go for prints, a small sensor camera with up to 600mm reach, or maybe a 300mm- 400mm lens and crop? I hope I have explained it correctly. What are the pros and cons? APS-C or small sensor?
    Thanks for your input.
     
  2. F2Bthere

    F2Bthere Premium Member

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    I think you are better off with the APSC sensor than a small-sensor camera. The Panasonic has a 1/2.3" sensor, which is really tiny.

    Do you have a tripod? That is most important when using really long lenses, especially since you are planning to compromise on the gear.

    You are, in essence, trying to capture small objects at great distances and the qualities of the colors and fine details matter. The standard of images of this type we are used to looking at is high--most practitioners are using top-end gear. Not to say it can't be done more economically....

    Not sure if I understand your goal correctly. If you are cropping from the equivelent of a 300mm lens down to the equivelent of a 600mm lens, the diagonal angle of view is cut in half, which is about like cropping 1/4 of the image. You are then discussing printing to 16x20, which is the equivelent to printing 32x40 from the full image.

    This is not completely insane, but it is going to force you to do a really good job on creating images. Hence my initial question about a tripod. Even at fast shutter speeds, it matters. More so with longer lenses. And even more so if you are cropping. And your exposure should be really good. And use lower ISO. And have good post processing skills. These will all be important no matter what. More so if you are compromising on gear.

    If you are comfortable with manual focus, you could adapt legacy lenses. There are some very good manual lenses, from Nikon especially, which can be had for more reasonable prices and adapted.
     
  3. jer1

    jer1 New Member

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    I'm not sure if I explained myself correctly. If I decide to get say a 300mm or 400mm lens, and adapt it for my X-t10, if I take pictures of a small animal or bird from a distance, is it possible to crop enough to get a reasonably large image of the bird without it looking like a gnat and still have a good image for printing? Or is that just wishful thinking? Yes I do have a tripod.
     
  4. leoda1945

    leoda1945 Premium Member

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    The question as you asked it is too vague to answer specifically.
    How big is the bird? How far away is it? How much of the image do you want it to occupy?

    A good print needs about (this is arguable) 300dots/inch.
    Let's says "dots" = "pixels" for the moment (this too is arguable).
    So an 8"X12" print needs 8X12X300X300 = 8.6Mp
    If your sensor is a 16Mp sensor, a good 8X12 print needs approximately half of your sensor area.
    Do the math for whatever other sizes you are thinking of printing.

    This topic can (and probably will) get really complex really fast, but what I just said is a decent starting point.
     
  5. jer1

    jer1 New Member

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