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Considering buying an Epson SC-P 600 - advice for or against?

Discussion in 'Printing (Instax and others)' started by Musicophile, Nov 22, 2017.

  1. Musicophile

    Musicophile Premium Member

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    After a friend of mine got a Canon Pro-1 last year, I really got into the habit of printing.

    I'm now considering buying my own, an Epson SC-P 600 (slightly cheaper, lighter, and less bulky than the Pro-1, plus Wifi).

    Before I do, any advice whether I've made the right choice or not? Any experience with this machine?
     
  2. wrgrimes

    wrgrimes Member

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    I moved to Epson from Canon years back. R1900 was good, but clogged (as did Canon). P600 is great. Color, B&W very good. Enjoy 13x19. I also use for routine printing, not as fast as basic or laser printer.
    First P600 broke at 2yr. No local repair. $250+ to ship and repair. Considering value of the included full set of ink and rebate, I bought another P600.
    If this one does not break, I will remain very pleased.
     
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  3. kenbennett

    kenbennett Premium Member

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    The P600 is very nice. You might consider the P800 as well. Two reasons: 1) the ink carts hold far more (80ml vs 26ml) so the ink costs are cheaper (Please login or register to view links, but their calculations are .68c for an 8x10 on the P800 and $1.02 on the P600, which over many years and prints will add up), and 2) being able to make a 16x20 inch print is actually rather nice. I never thought I would want to print that large, but I actually do a fair amount now.

    Not sure where you are, but B&H has the P800 for only $300 more than the P600 (both have rebates). That price difference is almost entirely the cost of the extra ink that comes with the printer (a full set of ink carts is $270 for the P600 and $500 for the P800, but note that the P800 carts have 3x the ink.)

    The downside is that the P800 is larger -- it's a substantial printer that will take up significant desk space or its own cart. It's also more expensive up front, of course, though that's the extra ink and not the printer. ving your o

    Hope you enjoy having your own printer. I find it's a lot of fun to print my own -- for the wall, as gifts, or just to hold as an object. I also do all our holiday and personal cards.
     
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  4. fiddlergene

    fiddlergene Premium Member

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    I had an Epson photo printer quite a few years ago, can't remember the model #. I now use the Canon Pixma Pro1.
    I found that Epson support sucked big time. I wanted to talk to a rep at the Javitz Photo Expo that year, and he was more interested in prospective new customers than in my technical issues. Epson May gave gotten better, but I really don't care at this point. Canon support is exemplary. I'll never buy another Epson product again.
     
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  5. Martin E

    Martin E Premium Member

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    Yes I too had an early Epson I had to throw away because of clogging and swore I'd never buy another. They've hopefully moved on a bit but I still hear stories. The trouble is there are only now two suppliers of photo printers at this level, just Epson and Canon (at least here in the UK). So we have little choice.
    I now use a Pro 10s. The difference between Canon and Epson is that Canon acknowledge and will support your use of third party papers whereas Epson are only interested in selling you their own products. Quite a different mindset.
     
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  6. qhs

    qhs Member

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    I have been printing with a Canon Pro-1o for a couple of years and I am very happy with it. I have never had a Canon printer clog or dry up on me and I have had several. You can forget about the high cost of inks if you refill. Precision Colors Inks have been a good supplier for me. A great source of photo printing and refilling info is Jose Rodriguez on youtube. He has the best printing info I have found. I am using a printing program, Qimage Ultimate That I highly reccomend. By the way, Qimage contains a little gem of a utility called "Print Nozzle Unclog Pattern" that will prevent any chance of clogging and actually save on ink as well. Hope this info is of help.
     
  7. Musicophile

    Musicophile Premium Member

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    Thanks for all the feedback. Very useful food for thought!
     
  8. trainer

    trainer Premium Member

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    Same here. I've been using Precision Inks too in my Pro 100. Great set of inks, easy to use and very inexpensive. I've used Qimage for at least 10 years. It's a very good program.
     
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  9. MurrayMinchin

    MurrayMinchin Premium Member

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    I have no experience digital printing yet, but swam in the deep end of B&W printing using 4x5 negatives and Lynn Radeka's sharp and unsharp pin registered masking techniques.

    On a recent holiday to the big city we made appointments to see the Canon Prograf 1000 and the Epson P800. We saw the Canon first, with promotional prints and prints made for customers. We then saw the Epson with promotional prints and prints made for customers. To our eyes the Epson's better print quality was recognizable from across the room.

    So, on image quality alone, we're going to run with the Epson. We'll make sure to make at least a small print every couple days, or once a week...whatever is recommended to avoid the clogging issue. The better quality (to our eyes) is worth the risk.

    The only way to know what will work for you is to make the comparison...
     
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  10. Musicophile

    Musicophile Premium Member

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    Thanks again for all the helpful feedback.

    I’ll probsbly go with the Epson in the end but am still hoping for a Black Friday or other discount.

    The clogging issue shouldn’t be a major problem as I plan to print s,all quantities regularly, and I just like the fliexbility of WiFi.

    I’ll report back when I have it.
     
  11. Musicophile

    Musicophile Premium Member

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    To give some feedback, after some more thinking and a 10% discount I just ended up ordering the SC-P 800.

    Thanks everybody for your input!
     
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  12. YogiMik

    YogiMik Premium Member

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    The best choice, I think.
     
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  13. kenbennett

    kenbennett Premium Member

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    Let us know how it turns out! :)
     
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  14. Musicophile

    Musicophile Premium Member

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    A quick update on this thread: I'm very happy with the purchase of my P800. The print quality I'm getting, especially on my favorite Canson Platine Fibre Rag, is just outstanding. And even with the relatively cheap Harman Luster paper I get excellent quality. I use the Canson for my own "archive" and occasional framing, and Harman Luster 260 for test prints and giveaways to friends and family.

    I was a huge learning curve, the number of options (perceptual, ultrafine, etc. etc. etc.) are just mind boggling. But after watching I don't know how many videos on Youtube (with often contradicting points of view even by the experts) I have figured out a workflow to print directly out of Capture One with good and consistent results. (Capture One's printing setup is also FAR from intuitive, much worse than the rest of the software, they probably just presume everybody will go through Photoshop anyhow).

    The only thing that really drives me nuts is the single sheet art paper feeder, I still get the occasional paper jam in this one.

    It's quite big, but given that it prints up to A2 it is probably as compact as it realistically could be. I didn't have enough space for it in my office together with my cheap Canon multipurpose printer/scanner, so the latter is now in the basement. Luckily I barely print anything anymore, and can do the occasional scan at the office.

    I've been spending quite a bit on paper recently, and dread the moment when the 80ml cartridges run empty (at $60 a pop x 9), but actually, 80 ml is quite a lot and I'll probably have some months left before I hit that pain point. But overall, compared to many other hobbies, this is still quite a cheap pleasure. An A4 print on Harman will cost me around €1, and an A3+ reference print on Canson Platine Fibre is around €6. So for the price of one slightly better lens, I can print probably an entire year's worth of museum quality pictures (by museum quality I mean the hardware, not the content...).

    Overall I'm so pleased having this thing at home. Holding your own pictures in A3+ on an amazing rag paper like Canson is a celebration (I'm typically wearing white gloves to protect the images, so it really feels like one as well).

    The prints typically end up in a beautiful PRAT archival box, which is also amazing to hold, and nice showing to friends. And some are already framed on the wall, which is even nicer.

    I've already made several friend happy by just giving them spontaneously some nice 13x18cm (5x7) or A4 prints.

    I can only encourage you to get an Epson P600/800 or something similar from Canon. Every photographer should have one.
     
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  15. Dirk Offringa

    Dirk Offringa Premium Member

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    Just don't forget to print each week a colorful print and a B&W one, so the pigments do not clog the ink lines. The day that happens, it'll be a huge pita and you'll need multilple cleaning cycles and most probably the .icc's will be off because you won't be able to get rid of all the residus in the ink lines, so the ink will flow at different speeds for all cartidges. If you reach that point, you'll need to reprofile your papers on a regular basis. Or send the printer in for repair. So....don't forget!
     
  16. Musicophile

    Musicophile Premium Member

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    Thanks for the advice. So far it is so much fun printing that I definitely do this. I hope I keep producing enough photos to keep that frequency up.
     
  17. kenbennett

    kenbennett Premium Member

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    I don't print every week, or even every month. I had a couple of clogs on my 3800 in the eight or nine years I used it, and one since I got the P800. They can be a pain, but all of them have been fixable with enough cleanings. I can live with one clog every couple of years.

    (Note that my worst clog ever came after leaving the printer On for a couple of weeks. Now I always turn it off even if I'm printing again the next day.)
     
  18. Musicophile

    Musicophile Premium Member

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    Thanks, that's helpful.

    I believe my one is set to automatically switch off after a while, some energy saving setting. Does anybody know if there's a lot of ink wasted when switching the printer on and off?
     
  19. Dirk Offringa

    Dirk Offringa Premium Member

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    Believe me, as I said you can always get the ink running again but residus might persist in the ink lines. The ICC's will be off. I know what I'm saying, I have a SC-P600 and experienced this. Left it unused for 3 months in summer. It means that I now need to make a custom profile for each paper because none of the manufacturer's profiles render OK, and it's VERY visible. I can live with that because I do have a X-Rite ColorMunki Photo and use only 3 - 4 diferent papers.

    Better safe than sorry!

    The issue illustrated: (for Epson Premium Glossy Photo Paper) (NOTE: to read these, please understand that a minor difference in these graphs make a major difference in actual print!

    1: the factory icc curves

    EPPGPP factory default.JPG


    2: the custom curve I made, and have been working with for 2 years before the incident

    EPGPP-custom.JPG


    3: the correction curve I need now, after having recovered from clogging

    EPGPP-custom-recovered.JPG

    This works for me because I have the calibration equipment, and am very picky about color management so I immediately notice if something's wrong and how to proceed.

    But I repeat, better safe than sorry!
     
  20. trainer

    trainer Premium Member

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    Could one run a nozzle check once a week or so to pump a bit of ink through?
     

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