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Compact Kit for Travel, what are your favorite sets?

Discussion in 'Native X-Mount Lens Forum' started by beakhammer, Apr 6, 2017.

  1. David Schneider

    David Schneider Premium Member

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    You could put an X-T2 and 55-200 in the inside pocket, although it might not be that comfortable.
     
  2. Frankie

    Frankie Premium Member

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    The whole idea of travelling light is just that...light. I hate wearing a vest or jacket laden with lumpy stuff.
     
  3. F2Bthere

    F2Bthere Premium Member

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    I hate going heavy with cameras for anything (although I have been known to haul a bunch of lights, but they are on stands when I'm shooting...).

    I also dislike an uneven load, especially over time. Everything in a shoulder bag is handy but unbalanced. A backpack is balanced but not handy. A hip belt and harness system is balanced and handy but looks like "business." So a vest seems like it might offer a good compromise of balance, handiness and not looking too out of place. At least that's why I'm curious...
     
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  4. David Schneider

    David Schneider Premium Member

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    F2Bthere,

    I've been to something like 50 countries. I've kind of stopped worrying about looking out of place. lol. Locals can spot a tourist by their walk, clothes, shoes, etc. But I don't feel too out of place with a black vest, black pants, black shoes in some very nice restaurants in Paris where I've gone three times in the last four years. So it works for me.

    My back is pretty bad and a shoulder bag kills me. I think that balance you mentioned is one of the reasons I like a camera on each shoulder underneath vest (or Scottiecoat). Now, no chance I'd do that with FF cameras, but with Fuji X it's like almost no weight at all.
     
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  5. beakhammer

    beakhammer Premium Member

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    Yes, and nice slender slippery straps mean the cameras come up to your eye easily, without catching. I am managing pretty well with a sling bag, as long as it doesn't get too heavy, but a vest is definitely more comfortable.

    Sometimes I use somewhat heavy cameras; the best solution for those is one of those figure-8 straps that OpTech makes, with quick clips to connect the camera(s) to the strap. The figure 8 strap is easily worn under your outer vest, jacket, or whatever, and it holds the camera in a very stable position, preventing it from flopping around, and still stays out of the way when the camera comes up to your eye. The strap spreads the load to both shoulders and down your back, so it makes even a large DSLR or medium format camera seem reasonably light. Because the camera slides on the straps, wearing a backpack or shoulder bag won't interfere with the system at all. The quick-clips allow you to remove the camera, or switch cameras, without needing to take your clothes off. This system also means that your cameras can go into a bag, or your pockets, without the added trouble of stuffing a strap in along with the camera. These straps stabilize the camera from both sides, so the camera can be worn much lower on your body, tucked away inside a partly zipped jacket or vest.

    For skiing and backpacking, when I need to carry a substantial backpack and still want ready access to cameras I use a large chest pouch that is supported by figure-8 shoulder straps as well. This spreads the load really well and makes carrying a couple of cameras, an extra lens or two, batteries and film with no problem at all. This front-pouch is more protective, weather resistant, and practical for active back-country travel than my vest is. It turns out to be so convenient that I use it in less adventurous settings sometimes as well, such as when I am carrying a bulky large format camera and a big tripod in a backpack, but I want to carry a small camera in a protected but easily accessible place. The front-pouch actually spreads your load, counterbalancing the backpack, and is a surprisingly comfortable and very convenient way to carry gear.

    There is no pretending that you are just a casual tourist when you have a bag of cameras strapped to your chest, or when wearing a big khaki vest covered with pockets, but I find that people often ignore me when I am wearing my mega-nerd disguise, possibly writing me off as a harmless hobbyist.
     
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  6. David Schneider

    David Schneider Premium Member

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    Black vest for me with black shirt most of the time. I wear it often in studio during the winter too.

    In Cuba I did use a lightweight Scottivest that was kind of a light tan. But I think there were only about four others I saw in a week wearing vests as it was 90F (30C) every day.

    I picked up my Canon bag to take to the studio and felt my back go. So glad there is gear that is lighter and can do the job. I'm getting close to replacing my 5DMk3 in the studio, but on camera stand it's not a weight thing.
     
  7. jutuiz71

    jutuiz71 Member

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    body
    samyang 12mm
    18-55 mm
    60mm
    EF20 flash (?)
    All fits into a tiny Crumpler Roady 2000 that goes into any other backpack.

    Alternative:
    body
    samyang 12mm
    18 mm
    27 mm
    60mm
    EF20 flash (?)
    All will still fit into a tiny Crumpler Roady 2000 that goes into any other backpack.
     
  8. thelonious58

    thelonious58 Member

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    A very interesting post. I am looking for a good bag such as Lowepro to carry my xe2s with XF18-55 ( preferably attached to the camera to prevent any dust ingress to the sensor) and spare batteries, SD cards, remote shutter release, blower etc. It would be nice if I could fit my small tripod in too. Can you recommend anything decent but not too expensive. I never travel abroad and avoid theft-prone areas. Thanks
     
  9. beakhammer

    beakhammer Premium Member

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    When I am carrying just a single camera and some doo-dads I prefer a small light sling-bag like the small "Think-Tank" sling bags. These provide quick access but are comfortable and compact. These little bags won't carry a tripod though. When I want to lug a tripod, even a light one, I really only consider a backpack. I don't have any camera backpacks that offer quick access to a camera (though there are many with a special side door camera space). I am more inclined to use a regular backpack that has straps that can support a tripod firmly against the side of the pack. I put my camera gear inside padded rectangular waterproof pouches made by Mountainsmith, placed inside the backpack. For bad weather, active hiking and mountaineering, or skiing, I will use a chest-pouch to protect the camera while allowing quick access, otherwise I just use a strap while I am shooting and stow the camera in it's pouch inside the pack when I don't want to shoot. With this approach I can use the protective camera bags and pouches with any backpack that suits the outing. The Mountainsmith pouches can be used in shoulder bags as well as backpacks. They are inexpensive and provide good padding, movable dividers and a dry-bag type waterproof closure. They are just the right size for Fuji-X cameras and all but the biggest lenses I use a separate small battery pouch to hold spare batteries and cards and just put this pouch in with the camera gear, or in a pocket for quick access:
    Please login or register to view links

    I found mine half-price on Sierra Trading Post.

    Traditional camera pouches like these: Please login or register to view links

    can easily be clipped to a backpack belt or shoulder strap for quick access to the camera.
     
  10. m.hermann

    m.hermann Member

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    This question still hasn't been answered by everyone ;) Here are my favourite compact sets for travelling.

    Small:
    No bag, just a ready case and
    X-E1 + XF 18-55mm if it's a new place
    or
    X-E1 + XF 35mm/1.4 if I have been before and want to go "normal".


    Medium:
    Lowepro Event Messenger 100 for camera with lens and extra lens,
    X-E1,
    XF 35mm/1.4,
    XF 18-55mm or XC 50-230mm depending on where I go,
    Fuji Silvi/ZoomDate F2.8 24-50mm compact camera with Provia 100F slide film.

    Large:
    Lowepro Event Messenger 100 for two lenses and ready case for camera with third lens,
    X-E1,
    XF 35mm/1.4,
    XF 18-55mm,
    XC 50-230mm,
    Fuji Silvi/ZoomDate F2.8 24-50mm compact camera with Provia 100F slide film.

    Each set might be accompanied by my Please login or register to view links loaded with slide film.

    The X-E1 is going to be replaced by an X-E3 soon. Currently debating with myself whether I want another lens.

    Marc
     
  11. Peterlourenco

    Peterlourenco Premium Member

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    On a recent trip to Japan I took my 16mm 1.4 and a adapted old nikkor 50mm f2.
    Used the 16mm 99% of the time ( just LOVE this lens )

    Got a 35mm f2 recently which is so small and light that it'll accompany the 16mm everywhere from now on.
     
  12. beakhammer

    beakhammer Premium Member

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    What I really bring on a trip.

    What I take on a trip depends on the trip, and on my goals at the time. I can make a list of what I might be likely to take currently, on a trip with the goal of general photography, and with reasonably lightweight options in mind. This list includes what I would want with me, but I would usually only carry one or two cameras at a time when actually shooting.

    Digital:
    Fuji X-E2, FX 35/1.4, FX 23/1.4, Zeiss Touit 12mm/2.8, FX 18/2
    FX-Minolta adapter and Minolta Celtic 50mm/3.5 macro.
    52mm Hoya IR filter

    Film:
    Rolleiflex Automat (TLR) with 75mm Tessar lens
    Mercury 3-D printed 4x5 camera with 6x7 and 6x9 roll-film backs, 90mm Schneider Angulon lens and/or 127mm/4.5 Rodenstock Ysarex lens, optical range finder, ground glass. Possibly 4x5 film holders and a dark-bag.
    Pentax K1000 with Pentax 50mm/1.7, 35mm/2.8 and Vivitar 20mm/3.8 and M-42 to PK adapter.**
    FX-PK adapter
    Luna-Pro light meter
    Kodak Portra 400, Portra 160 and Ektar 100 films in 120 format
    Kodak Portra 160 and Fuji Pro400H in 135 format

    Small travel tripod and QR plates
    Cable release
    Remote release
    Mechanical time-release trigger
    Headlamp

    Mountainsmith Descent Sling bag
    Large Lowe-Pro Shoulder bag
    small Lowe-Pro backpack

    **I might substitute a small rangefinder camera for shooting in 135 format, instead of the SLR.
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2017

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