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Better BW JPEGs

Discussion in 'X-Pro2 and X-Pro1' started by dixeyk, Oct 12, 2017 at 6:10 AM.

  1. boulevardier

    boulevardier Premium Member

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    That's good advice. Red filter under blue skies is too much contrast for my taste, though red can pump things up in typical grey English weather. Years ago I shot a lot of "street" photos in parks and gardens and a green filter was permanently on the cameras, as it lifted the dense foliage to a more manageable tone closer to the people.
     
  2. boulevardier

    boulevardier Premium Member

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    Perhaps my resistance to digital B&W is its ability to keep highlights under control, which mushes up the shadows? Maybe I've looked at Japanese photography so long my aesthetic meter is set to Grade 5!
     
  3. specLegacy

    specLegacy Premium Member

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    DR200 and DR400 should retain highlights better. I like DR200 because it makes the highlights roll off more gradually and not have a sudden clip, but still retains a similar look to DR100 in the rest of the image. I set my camera to DR-Auto so to allow it to revert to DR100 when the exposure calls for ISO lower than 400. To me, DR400 starts looking unnatural most of the time.
     
  4. dixeyk

    dixeyk Dabbler

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    Thank you all for the great advice. I can't wait to try it out this afternoon.
     
  5. boulevardier

    boulevardier Premium Member

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    Some of the B&W editing pre-sets I use are very like specLegacy's recommendation, but they introduce artificial vignetting which has the effect of "sealing" the corners of the image. As this often coincides with sky, blown out highlights are less apparent.
     
  6. streetsntravel

    streetsntravel Premium Member

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    Perfect.... ;) . I have a sticky-note on the palm support of my MacBook that has 49 little "spreadsheet-like" notations where I did just that varying Highlight by 1 increment, then shadow by seven different images, 1 for each possible shadow increment - all on the same image. Then the evaluation. What I found was that it was a bit easier to examine in increments of two because I just got exhausted trying to see the "real" difference when incrementing by one. So I started out with highlight=-2, then varied the jpg generation for each of the seven (-2...+4) shadow values; then increment highlight=-1 and repeat.
     
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  7. dixeyk

    dixeyk Dabbler

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    Okay then, I have tweaked my setting and I'll start some testing. Best to really dig in and find out how the system will react and what I need to do to make the most of it.
     
  8. AdrianG

    AdrianG Premium Member

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    Just like post processing, preprocessing takes some time to figure it out :)

    The more you use and the longer you keep the same camera and lenses, the more it pays.
     
  9. The Judge

    The Judge Member

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    Here is a suggestion I found online by a wedding photographer that gives wild results:

    DR: 100
    Film Simulation: B+W Red
    White Balance: 10,000K
    Shadows and Highlights and Sharpness to taste
    NR: -2

    My own custom shooting modes settings (I shoot all-manual exposure settings):
    1.
    DR: 100
    Film Simulation: B+W Red
    White Balance: 6300K (-1, -1)
    Sharpness: +1
    Shadows: +1
    Highlights: +1
    NR: -2

    6.
    DR: 100
    Film Simulation: B+W Green
    White Balance: 6300K (-1, -1)
    Sharpness: +1
    Shadows: +2
    Highlights: +1
    NR: -2

    7.
    DR: 100
    White Balance: 6300K (-1, -1)
    Sharpness: 0
    Shadows: -1
    Highlights: -1
    NR: -2

    Numbered as to where they are on my list. The "color filters” don’t quite act like they did on film in practice. Red doesn’t make blue skies significantly darker and Green does not lighten foliage. I do like the look of the Red filter on womens' skin because it has a luminous bloom, but I have to be careful because it can bleed into light toned hair.

    I use 7. indoors with high contrast light. Notice how I manually set the white balance. You can bring out more and more of the low-light sensitivity of any ISO setting by raising the Kelvin correction. You can even see this when setting white balance on a RAW file. Combining the 10,000K white balance with the Red filter allows both amazing sensitivity and contrast. This comes at the expense of color data should you try to do black and white conversions with software. More JPEG sharpening helps you focus with the EVF and is more accurate than focus peaking on the X-Pro1 but sharpening JPEGS also sharpens noise and for detail, ham-handed.

    All that said, these are settings I use on Fujinon lenses and I almost always shoot RAW when shooting black and white. I sometimes use a 1.7/55 Minolta that is every bit as good as a Fujinon, but I shoot RAW and either edit RAW or convert in camera because the exposure and contrast is a bit unpredictable and I have accidentally blown out highlights. What you can get straight from the X-Pro1 is a good start, but it is no replacement for Nik Silverefex.
     

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