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90mm f2 with 16mm extension tube as a better macro alternative?

Discussion in 'Native X-Mount Lens Forum' started by GreenGuy33, Mar 19, 2017.

  1. GreenGuy33

    GreenGuy33 Premium Member

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    Instead of waiting for the 80mm macro lens or the current 60mm macro (which I have), has anyone tried a Fuji 90mm f2 with extension tube(s)?
    I would like to get the 90mm lens for portraits, as well as macro, since I have Fuji's 2 extension tubes (11 and 16mm).
     
  2. J J

    J J Premium Member

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    Have you seen this table Please login or register to view links ? It appears that the max magnification with the MCEX-16 would be doubled to 0.4, with the working distance reduced to 280mm. Don't actually own that lens unfortunately.
     
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  3. GreenGuy33

    GreenGuy33 Premium Member

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    So, the 60mm macro would still have better magnification?
     
  4. J J

    J J Premium Member

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    Looks like it. I think it still would even if you doubled up both tubes. I thought about buying the 60 ages ago but obtained a used Tamron SP90 for playing around with macro instead even though I do have the MCEX-16. Of course I can only focus that manually. If I have a household cash injection around the time the 80 is released I will be sorely tempted.
     
  5. GreenGuy33

    GreenGuy33 Premium Member

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    I thought I read somewhere that the 80mm macro will be very expensive.
     
  6. J J

    J J Premium Member

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    I think I did too. Which makes it all the more desirable already. I have explained to my wife how my hand-me-down Tamron has a very stiff focus ring and how extension tubes stop me being able to focus to infinity. A lot more chipping away required probably.
     
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  7. NYRich

    NYRich Premium Member

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    I haven't heard anything firm about the price of the 80mm but, based on the specs, I'll be shocked if it doesn't street for somewhere between $800-$1,000. Given that a large percentage of what I shoot is macro, I'll be biting the bullet regardless of the cost as I don't anticipate Fuji offering a rebate on it for quite some time.
     
  8. GreenGuy33

    GreenGuy33 Premium Member

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    I found an article that rumors the cost at $1195.
     
  9. beakhammer

    beakhammer Premium Member

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    I have used both Fuji extension tubes with a number of lenses, and they work very well. As I am sure you are aware, the main problem with using the extension tubes, compared to a proper Macro lens, is that with an extension tube mounted and only the focus throw of a non-macro lens available, you have only a very narrow range of focus to work with, which limits your magnification and framing options. This means that you are limited to only shots and framing that are in that narrow available working distance. In practice this can be fine, because you simply move the camera until the subject comes into focus (I like to work with the camera set to manual focus mode), then shoot, but a macro lens (with no extension tube) will give you the whole range of options from the close-focus distance to infinity.

    The macro lens is much more versatile, but if you want a long portrait lens more than a macro lens then you might prefer the 90mm and extension tube combination.

    When you use an extension tube with a macro lens the range of focus is also decreased (and you lose infinity focus), but the very long range of focus on a macro lens gives you a better range of working distances and framing options, so that's a vote for the macro option.
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2017
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  10. beakhammer

    beakhammer Premium Member

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    Since you already have a Macro lens as well as both tubes, I would lean toward getting the 90mm myself, unless you really like to shoot a lot of macro.

    The 90mm with the tube may not give as much magnification, but the working distance will be a lot better than your 60mm. In addition, when you get into high magnifications and long lenses the depth of field gets ridiculously tiny, requiring the use of extra lighting in a lot of situations.

    One advantage of the macro over the 90mm is that it will likely have smaller aperture options, probably at least an extra stop down, for greater DOF.
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2017
  11. GreenGuy33

    GreenGuy33 Premium Member

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    The majority of my photography is macro and close-up work. I have heard a lot of great things about the 90mm lens, but I may end up waiting for the 80mm f2.8 macro.
     
  12. beakhammer

    beakhammer Premium Member

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    I would wait too in that case. In the mean time, have you messed around with any adapted macro lenses? I have found some to work very well, especially a couple of Vivitar lenses and one Nikkor.
     
  13. GreenGuy33

    GreenGuy33 Premium Member

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    No, I haven't tried them.
     
  14. beakhammer

    beakhammer Premium Member

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    They would give you a low-cost way to shoot macro with a longer lens while you are waiting. Look for Vivitar series 1 macro lenses and Vivitar "Close-focus" lenses in any mount. I feel sure Canon FD macro lenses are excellent and relatively cheap. I have an 80mm/4 macro lens for Mamiya 645 medium format cameras that is really excellent. The Micro-Nikkor 55mm/2.8 is great too, but you already have a 60mm.
     
  15. beakhammer

    beakhammer Premium Member

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    I also use an old Minolta Bellows setup with my Fuji cameras. These are cheap, and mine came with a focusing rail included. I use an FX-Minolta mount adapter to connect my Fuji to the bellows, and then can potentially adapt a wide range of lenses to the other end. Flange-back distances don't matter for close-focus work, so you can even pop the correction lens out of those adapters that are designed to mount a lens with a short flange-back distance on a camera with a long one (better optical IQ with the correction lens removed).
     
  16. jknights

    jknights Moderator Staff Member

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    Expensive is relative!
    Everything is expensive if you cant afford it.
    :D:)
     
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  17. GreenGuy33

    GreenGuy33 Premium Member

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    True. I guess that's what credit cards are for. :)
     
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  18. beakhammer

    beakhammer Premium Member

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    Therefore, most things are currently very expensive. On the bright side the high cost of new gear has led me to discover the joys of $15 cameras.
     
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  19. cug

    cug Premium Member

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    The resulting image will lose sharpness due to diffraction though. For critters focus stacking is often not an option, but it's definitely something that gets interesting with the higher and higher resolving sensors when you like to crop out areas of the image.
     
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  20. beakhammer

    beakhammer Premium Member

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    Yes, but sometimes a bit of diffraction is worthwhile if you want to get the bug's butt in focus.
    Focus stacking appeals to me and I plan to try it soon, particularly for studio shots (wind is the very devil outdoors). I have seen good bugs-in-the-garden work done with focus stacking too though. Early on a cold morning when there is no wind and the bugs are sluggish is best.
    A focusing rail can be a big help for focus-stacking.
     
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