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Lens protection.. UV or no UV ?

Discussion in 'Fuji X-Mount Lens Forum' started by geoffjess, May 8, 2017.

  1. CSG

    CSG Well-Known Member

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    I used (use) Hoya and Vivitar clear filters on my film camera lenses as well as lens hoods. I've been doing that since the 70's. I use B+H clear filters on my digital camera lenses as well as lens hoods. I don't care if it helps or hurts as my images are pleasing to me and I'd rather clean a filter than the lens. I've never broken a filter but I've cleaned a few.
     
  2. F2Bthere

    F2Bthere Premium Member

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    I have seen cameras fall, with and without filters. I have spent too much time talking with fellows in the repair departments at camera stores (I'm sure there are women who do this work, but I haven't run into them so far).

    Cameras seem to fall lens first most of the time. They tend to hit with the edge of the front of the lens quite frequently. If there is a filter, the metal ring is often dented. Sometimes the glass breaks. When there is a filter on the camera, the lens is rarely damaged. When there is no filter on the camera, the filter ring (what you screw the filter into) is often damaged. Sometimes the lens mechanism gets damaged. Sometimes the AF stops working. Rarely the glass breaks.

    But the main damage you protect yourself from is cleaning marks on your lens :)

    As for the filter affecting image quality: you are a bit more likely to get flare with a filter than without. Use a hood and this issue is almost gone. If the filter is clean and of good quality, most of the negative effects of the filter on image quality are quite minimal. If you are shooting wide open, I'd be surprised if anyone would notice.

    If you are stopping down and making large landscape prints, you might want to test and take the filter off. Shooting complex circuit board, detailed items for printing in a catalog, test and see.

    You will see far more impact from precise exposure control, use of a tripod, use of a hood, etc than you are likely to notice negative impact from use of a filter.

    I recommend that anyone who is really worried about this, put you camera on a tripod in a situation where the light and subject are consistent, shoot a series of images at different f-stops with and without a filter, print them out with marks on the back and do a blind comparison of f2.8 with vs without, f8 with vs without, etc and see if you or others can reliably tell the difference.

    These are my opinions and worth what you paid for them. ;)
     
  3. GregWard

    GregWard Premium Member

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    Any impact that was hard enough to damage the lens itself will simply not be prevented by 1-2mm of glass held in a thin metal ring. If you view the video linked to above you'll see that the damage is often other than to the front element anyway - often the rear element, or the focus/zoom mechanism etc. Even if nothing is broken as such - there remains a question of elements being knocked out of alignment etc. A filter can protect against scratches (to an extent) but nothing more serious.

    He did also address the issue of damage to the filter ring in that same video. It is clearly true that something screwed into the ring on the lens can prevent some distortion if the lens impacts in that way. But a complete prevention of distortion is probably very unlikely. So his experience - in actual testing - appears to be a filter locked on to the lens. In both cases a trip to the repair shop is the most likely outcome. In any event it isn't such a bad idea to send a lens off to be examined if it has been involved in a serious drop.
     
  4. KenML

    KenML New Member

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    I use Fuji protection filters on my lenses. These are the only filters that Fuji produces and I have never had a problem with them.
     

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